Speakers and Presentation Topics

(listed alphabetically, by speaker's last name)

Sensor hubs for wearables: evolution and emerging trends
Francois Beauchaud
Principal Engineer
Bosch Sensortec

Over the last few years, the sensing capabilities of wearable devices have progressed significantly. Smarter, cheaper and more power efficient sensors are available today. Furthermore, measurement technologies that were once only used in applications with less stringent size and power requirements (e.g. automotive) are now within the reach of the IoT-enabled world. As such, the new use cases require a level of efficiency of embedded processing that goes beyond the capabilities of the current application processors (APs) or microcontrollers (MCUs), both of which usually require extensive engineering resources and time for specific application optimization. To alleviate this problem, some of the emerging wearable device architectures now incorporate a dedicated sensor hub which is placed between the sensors' data streams and the core processing units (e.g. the AP and/or the MCU). The sensor hub takes care of the repetitive, always-on, and specific sensor tasks which are optimized for low power and low latency, thus offloading the main system controller to focus on tasks such as the graphical user interface. This presentation will provide an overview of the existing smart hub architectures and their advantages, as well as disadvantages, for specific applications. The talk will also discuss the evolution and emerging trends of sensor hubs for wearable applications, as well as the current competitive landscape.

Biography: Francois Beauchaud started working with MEMS devices even before he graduated with a Masters Degree in Electronic Engineering from the Institut des Sciences Appliquees (INSA) of Lyon, France in 2007. While pursuing his Engineering Diploma, Francois also obtained a Master Degree in Microelectronics from the University Claude Bernard of Lyon. He is currently based in Palo Alto, California as a Principal Engineer at Bosch Sensortec. Francois previously held the position of Senior Field Applications Engineer North America for Bosch Sensortec from 2010 to 2014 and Applications Engineer for Bosch Sensortec in Germany from 2008 to 2010.

Gas sensors for wearables: trends, challenges and opportunities
Jess Brown, PhD
Sales and Marketing Director
Cambridge CMOS Sensors

Gas sensors have been around since the early 1900s, but have only recently become small and cheap enough to be integrated into consumer electronics devices. This presentation will give a brief history of gas sensors and the typical applications they are currently used in. The talk will also demonstrate how the technology has progressed to such an extent that gas sensors are now being considered an essential next-generation component in wearable devices. Integration challenges will be described, along with the possible use cases that will make gas sensors a "must have" for the consumers. The presentation will also look at the emerging technologies and the next-generation of gas sensors, as well as trends that could be adopted in the future wearable device market. Wearables are allowing the user to gain more insight into their behaviors, health and wellbeing. This presentation will show how wearables will also empower the consumer to measure their environment.

Biography: Dr. Jess Brown has over 20 years' experience in the semiconductor industry having been involved in several areas including research, applications, regional marketing, business development, product line management and sales. Having a strong technical background combined with excellent commercial understanding, he has a proven track record of driving development, company strategy and directing multi-disciplinary teams to deliver state-of-the-art products. Founded in 2008, Cambridge CMOS Sensors (CCS) is the industry leader in advanced sensor solutions providing sensor technology across multiple global markets. The technology developed by CCS offers a radical step change in performance, resulting in ultra-low power consumption, fast response time, embedded intelligence and ultra-small form factors. This has enabled the growth of new application areas for improved health and wellbeing such as ambient air quality monitoring and breath analysis in smartphones, tablets, wearables and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

Demystifying MEMS microphones for wearables
Matt Crowley
CEO
Vesper

MEMS microphones are commonly designed into smartwatches and wrist-worn activity trackers because they provide the essential voice user interface (VUI) that lets consumers interact with their wearable device.  In addition to the VUI, wearables can use MEMS microphones to actualize new applications, including buttonless multi-tap interfaces, acoustic heart rate monitoring, and ultrasonic sensing and communications.  But in order to make these new applications a reality, designers must overcome severe design constraints in size, power and reliability.  Reliability is especially important because the human body can be a harsh environment for electronic systems.  Common environmental contaminants such as dust, water and sweat destroy capacitive MEMS microphones because these microphones require a multi-layer backplate and diaphragm structure that traps contaminants.  Fortunately, there is an alternative.  Unlike capacitive MEMS microphones, piezoelectric MEMS microphones have a simple single-layer design so there is no place for water or dust to get trapped.  This makes them inherently waterproof, dustproof and remarkably durable.  Session attendees will learn about current MEMS microphone technologies, design considerations for wearables, and emerging capabilities that can change the game.

Biography: Matt Crowley, CEO of Vesper, is passionate about building great teams to bring disruptive technologies to market.  Prior to joining Vesper, Matt was founder and VP of Business Development at Sand 9, where he pioneered the development of piezoelectric MEMS for mobile timing.  At Sand 9, Matt raised $50 million in capital and led partnerships with industry leaders such as Intel, Ericsson and CSR.  Sand 9 was spun out of Boston University Office of Technology Development, where Matt was responsible for commercializing university technology, managing an internal venture capital fund and investing in VCs.  Before joining BU, Matt worked at Mars & Co strategy consulting, where he advised Fortune 500 companies on operational and strategic issues.  Matt received an interdisciplinary degree in Physics and the Philosophy of Science from Princeton University.

System architectures for wearable devices: emerging trends and developments
Boaz Efroni Rotman
Strategic Marketing – SoC Roadmap
Intel

Wearable devices drive new system constraints which are not prevalent on smartphones and tablets. One needs more integration and smaller overall solution footprint, unlike the larger mobile devices where the increased display provides ample board space. The device height (Z dimension) also becomes a major factor for all of the components. In addition, consumers have become accustomed to charging the mobile devices every day (or sometimes multiple times per day). However, when it comes to wearable devices such as watches, consumers expect to wear them for months or years before they need to replace a battery. Also, in order to get the "stickiness" factor, one must design a device with features and services that provides valuable and timely information to the user. A wearable device by nature of its definition, has the unique attribute of being attached to the body. This is where the advantage of multiple sensors and biosensors come into play, which also requires a smarter way to manage them and "decipher" their outputs. As such, new hardware architectures and usage scenarios come into play for wearable device. This talk will discuss existing and emerging system architectures for wearables, as well as product roadmaps including SoC and sensor fusion developments.

Biography: Boaz Efroni Rotman is the Director of Strategic Marketing for Intel's wearable SoC Roadmap. He has over twenty years of successful marketing, business development, and sales experience in the global high tech market. Prior to joining Intel, Boaz was the Director of Segment Marketing for imaging SoCs at CSR, opening new markets into sports camera, dash cameras, and surveillance. Prior to CSR, Boaz was the founder and CEO of SmartLine Systems, a home telephony equipment company, working with telecom companies around the globe to provide new and innovative services. Before that, Boaz served as the VP of Marketing and Sales at CellGuide (GNSS technology), Associate Director of Marketing and Sales at Horizon Semiconductors (set-top box and broadcasting multimedia SoC), and Director of Business Development at Global Locate (a fabless A-GPS IC company bought by Broadcom in 2007). Boaz holds a BS degree in Electrical Engineering from the Ben-Gurion University in Israel, and an MBA degree (Summa Cum Laude) from Netanya Academic College.

Making sense of how consumers are responding to wearables
John Feland, PhD
CEO
Argus Insights

Bioimpedance sensors, multi-axis gyros, pulse oximeters, electrocardiograms, food identification devices, and other gadgets are increasingly being placed into the hands of consumers.  Wearable devices are rapidly becoming the main platform to handle as many sensing functions as possible for the excited, but sometimes unsuspecting consumers.  Through the analysis of over 300,000 consumer product reviews, this talk will focus on which sensors are failing to help their users make sense of their activity, performance, and surroundings.  The talk will include a discussion about ways in which wearable device companies are integrating sensors to drive adoption.  The presentation will also showcase lessons learned on how *not* to bring a new technology to market, with a special focus on sensing devices and technologies.  Finally, this talk will explore unmet consumer needs and identify areas where new sensor technologies could help drive further growth in the wearables market.

Biography: John Feland is an award-winning founder and CEO of Argus Insights, Silicon Valley's first big data driven market coach firm.  Recognizing that companies are constantly striving to achieve and sustain market fit in the face of competitive threats and shifting customer preferences, Argus Insights with their patent pending technology continuously monitors and analyzes millions of consumer touchpoints to measure the degree to which products satisfy market demand.  These tools and methods have allowed Argus Insights to beat Wall Street estimates of consumer adoption in smartphones, wearables, consumer IoT, and other markets.  John holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from MIT, an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University, and a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University.  An expert in consumer response to technology, John is a frequent event speaker and his reports are cited in top publications such as Fortune, Forbes, San Francisco Chronicle, as well as dozens of technology magazines.

Flexible technologies: the next frontier for wearable devices
Edzer Huitema, PhD
CTO
Polyera

Most current wearables are built around traditional, rigid components; this greatly limits their usability, as the human body is flexible and curved. Especially smartwatches, using rigid, flat displays, can only use a small-sized display to fit onto the wrist. This limits the interaction models and usability in a similar way the candy bar phones from 15 years ago limited the usability of the mobile phone. A logical next step for wearable technology is therefore the use of flexible components. This will result in products utilizing the body's available surface area in a much more efficient way, leading to new devices with enhanced capabilities and use. This talk will discuss the current status and outlook of flexible displays and other flexible components for wearable device application. The talk will also present the first wearable product which utilizes a large flexible display.

Biography: Dr. Edzer Huitema is the CTO of Polyera, a global start-up company enabling flexible electronic products. Edzer has 15 years of experience in flexible displays and product design using flexible displays. Prior to joining Polyera, Edzer was the CTO of Polymer Vision, a Philips spin-out pioneering flexible displays and products incorporating them. Prior to that, Edzer held various management positions at Philips. Edzer holds over 140 granted U.S. and foreign patents, and has published over 40 papers and 3 book chapters on flexible electronics. Edzer holds a PhD in Physical Chemistry from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands.

Integration of electronics in textiles: technological challenges and solutions
Malte von Krshiwoblozki
R&D Project Manager
Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration

The market for wearable electronics will grow rapidly during the next 5 years. Sensor systems for monitoring body signals and motion will play an important role in the emerging wearable e-health, fitness, and security market. In particular, textile based systems offer lucrative opportunities because they are stretchable, breathable, and easily adapt to the shape of the human body. However, technological challenges have to be overcome to handle the harsh and diverse applications of textile based wearable sensor systems. This talk will provide an overview of different technologies suitable for the textile manufacturing circuitry. Also, the available diversity of suitable conductors such as metallized polymer yarns (which can be used as electrodes), or special copper litz wires (which are preferred for energy distribution) will be discussed. Additionally, general challenges to integrate electronics and several technologies (such as soldering, ICA/NCA-gluing and force-fit) with compatibility indication for the different textile circuitries will be reviewed. Finally, observations regarding appropriate system design and packaging of the modules will complete the review.

Biography: Malte von Krshiwoblozki is an R&D engineer and project manager at Fraunhofer IZM/TU in Berlin, Germany. He holds a degree in microsystem technologies. During several large EU and national interdisciplinary research projects (e. g. PLACE-IT and PASTA) he gained deep knowledge of emerging technologies for future markets. Malte's primary expertise and interest is in ''e-textiles", and also in stretchable and flexible electronics. His research has been concentrated on interconnection technologies to merge electronics and textiles, as they are important enablers to move wearable "e-textiles" from lab prototypes to volume production and the mainstream market.

Motion sensing technology trends and applications for wearable devices
Ben Lee
President and CEO
mCube

Motion sensors are already embedded in millions of wearable gadgets on the market today and more are being introduced. However, many of these wearable devices face adoption and user retention challenges. What are the application trends that will truly make wearables an integral part of our everyday lives? And how will advancements in motion sensing technology enable this? Important innovation is happening with MEMS technology and system level integration that will enable radical new ways in which motion sensors can be used to capture life's movements. This session will provide a comprehensive overview of current and emerging uses of motion sensors in wearable devices, as well as emerging motion sensor technologies and solutions. The presentation will also review the current technology trends and challenges associated today's motion sensor designs, and how MEMS suppliers are approaching these challenges. Finally, this talk will explore how new innovations will deliver motion sensors that are microscopic in size, consume very little power, and are so cost-effective that they will "evolve" wearables as we know them today into devices that become an integral part of life for billions of people around the world.

Biography: Mr. Ben Lee is President and Chief Executive Officer of mCube, Inc. He has over 20 years of senior management experience in the semiconductor industry with a successful track record of driving rapid revenue and profit growth in the global consumer electronics market. Prior to mCube, he served as SVP of Worldwide Sales at Cypress Semiconductor Corporation. Prior to Cypress, he served as VP of Worldwide Sales at Trident Microsystems and COO at Apexone Microelectronics, based in Shanghai. Mr. Lee has also served as VP Asia Pacific at Altera Corporation, General Manager of China at National Semiconductor Corporation, and VP of Worldwide Marketing at Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing in Singapore. He holds a BSEE from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and a MBA from Golden Gate University, San Francisco. Mr. Lee serves on the Industry Advisory Board for Cal Poly Electrical Engineering and is a Board Director of Ten Degrees, Inc.

Soft-matter sensing for wearable health monitoring
Tingrui Pan, PhD
Associate Professor
University of California, Davis

Wearable and mobile health monitoring technologies have recently received enormous interest worldwide due to the rapidly aging global populations and the drastically increasing demand for in-home healthcare. Body worn sensors, which can provide real-time continuous measurement of pertinent physiological parameters noninvasively and comfortably for extended periods of time, are of crucial importance for emerging applications of mobile medicine. Wearable sensors that can wirelessly provide pertinent health information while remaining unobtrusive, comfortable, low cost, and easy to operate and interpret, play an essential role. This talk will provide a comprehensive overview of emerging soft-matter sensing technologies with the state-of-the-art materials, fabrication process flows and their potential health-related applications. As compared to the solid-state counterparts, these new types of wearable sensors could potentially offer high device sensitivities, flexible stretchable constructs, adaptive properties to body ergonomics, and improved biocompatibility, which are all crucial to continuous health monitoring in the next-generation of wearables.

Biography: Professor Tingrui Pan received B.Eng degree in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (Beijing, China), and MS degree in Biomedical Engineering, MSEE degree and PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. In 2006, Prof. Pan joined in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Davis, where he is currently an Associate Professor and Director of Micro-Nano Innovations (MiNI) Laboratory (http://mini.ucdavis.edu). He directs the Center for Nano and Micro Manufacturing (CNM²), a 10,000 sq ft cleanroom facility for micro and nanofabrication (http://research.engineering.ucdavis.edu/cnm2). His latest research interests include nanofluidic sensing, nanofabrication, bio-nano-interface, bioelectricity, lab-on-a-chip, digital chemistry, mobile health and regenerative medicine. He has authored and co-authored more than eighty refereed journal and conference publications and held more than 15 US and international patents/patent applications. He was a recipient of NSF CAREER Award and Xerox Foundation Award, and a co-recipient of NSF EFRI Award. In 2011, Dr. Pan received the Outstanding Engineering Junior Career Faculty Award and the Outstanding Service Award from UC Davis.

Wearables at the peak of inflated expectations: myths and realities
Michele Reitz
Principal Research Analyst
Gartner

Wearables, as a subset of the Internet of Things (IoT), are oft-hyped as a potential "net new" opportunity for semiconductor market growth. This talk will quantify the revenue opportunity for semiconductor players overall with a focus on key wearables categories and a cost analysis for these devices based on teardowns. We will look at the competitive landscape for semiconductors in the IoT, with a deeper dive on how these vendors are gaining share in wearables, and which sensors and companies are leading the pack. Since the market is still emerging, we will turn to valuable use cases that have materialized that are truly are compelling, such as saving time and money or improving quality of life for the user. Finally, we will look at next-generation sensors in wearable applications, and conclude with a call to action to the wearables and sensors electronics community.

Biography: Michele Reitz is a Principal Research Analyst in the Semiconductor group of Gartner's Semiconductor and Electronics division. She focuses on semiconductors in consumer markets, including wearables and the Internet of Things, FPGAs and EDA. Ms. Reitz has almost 30 years of experience in the semiconductor and electronic equipment industry. Her positions include hardware design, application engineering and technical sales roles in leading electronic design automation, semiconductor and service companies, giving her a deep understanding of the semiconductor design flow and technologies. Prior to her current position, Ms. Reitz was a Client Account Executive at Gartner for more than four years, focused on high-end semiconductor and end-user clients. Before Gartner, she worked in various roles, including sales and sales management, applications engineering, and design engineering for semiconductor, electronic design automation software and systems companies. Ms. Reitz holds a Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering (Computer Engineering and Processor-Based Design) from Georgia Tech.

Electroactive polymer-based technologies: opportunities for wearable applications
Jason Rouse, PhD
Technical Marketing Manager
Wacker Chemical

For the past 15 years, electroactive polymers (EAPs) have been an active research area that is now quickly making its way into wearable devices.  While early research and commercialization centered around the ability of electroactive polymers to produce actuation movement, and therefore artificial muscle structures, recent development has also expanded into using the technology for stress and force sensors and even energy generation.  The use of the "capacitance" properties of electroactive polymers, coupled with low-cost and compact electronics, is allowing their cost effective integration into a host of products.  This talk will review the physics behind EAPs, a brief history of technology development, the role of silicone elastomers, and then focus on the many innovative solutions appearing on the market and being integrated into wearables.  The presentation will include a discussion of the key commercial and R&D technology players, as well as existing challenges and what's coming up on the EAP technology roadmap in the next few years.

Biography: Dr. Jason Rouse joined Wacker Chemical Corporation in 2013 as the Technical Marketing Manager for Electronics and LED.  One of the product lines he oversees in North America is the ELASTOSIL® Films, ultrathin and highly uniform silicone sheets used in the production of electroactive polymer devices.  Dr. Rouse's experience in electroactive polymers dates back to the early 2000s when he worked on silicone-based electroactive systems at the NASA Langley Research Center.  Prior to moving to Wacker he worked in the area of conductive materials and printed electronics at Ferro Corporation and Sun Chemical.  Jason holds a PhD from Lehigh University and a MBA from Fordham University.

Energy efficient wearables: an ounce of preprocessing is worth a pound of computing
Timothy Saxe, PhD
Sr. Vice President and CTO
QuickLogic

A basic wearable device is essentially a sensor node that reads sensor data at 100Hz or so, converts it into information at 1Hz or so, and then uploads it to a processing node (which is typically a smart phone). The typical computation flow can be divided between the "always-on" processing that happens at 100Hz, and the intermittent processing that happens at 1Hz or less. As it turns out, 99% of the energy is spent on the "always-on" processing and only approximately 1% on the intermittent processing. This means that saving energy in the "always-on" processing has a large effect on battery life. One way to make computations more energy efficient is to implement them directly in hardware, and many of the "always-on" functions lend themselves to this approach. This presentation will show how careful allocation of sensor processing functions between software and hardware can result in significant levels of power reduction.

Biography: Dr. Timothy Saxe joined QuickLogic in May 2001 and has served as the company's Sr. Vice President and Chief Technology Officer since November 2008. Prior to this role, Dr. Saxe served as QuickLogic's Chief Technology Officer and Sr. Vice President of Engineering from August 2006 to November 2008, and as Vice President of Software Engineering from May 2001 to August 2006. From November 2000 to February 2001, Dr. Saxe was Vice President of Flash Engineering at Actel Corporation, a semiconductor manufacturing company. Dr. Saxe joined GateField Corporation, a design verification tools and services company formerly known as Zycad, in June 1983 and was a founder of their semiconductor manufacturing division in 1993. Dr. Saxe became GateField's Chief Executive Officer in February 1999 and served in that capacity until GateField was acquired by Actel in November 2000. Mr. Saxe holds a BSEE degree from North Carolina State University, and MSEE and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

Development of flexible-hybrid electronics manufacturing and potential impacts on wearables
Paul Semenza
Director
FlexTech Alliance

Wearable applications present significant challenges to electronics design and manufacturing. While flexible electronic devices are available for some important functions, the specifications needed for processing, imaging, and other high-performance functions typically require semiconductor devices whose packaging is rigid and bulky. By combining these technologies, flexible hybrid electronics systems offer the potential for high performance in thin, lightweight, conformable packages, while enabling enhanced sensing and communications capabilities as well as the potential for active functions such as soft robotics and medical intervention. However, the ability to manufacture such systems is currently limited, as the printed electronics and semiconductor segments tend to be distinct. The creation of the Flexible Hybrid Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute, a public-private venture, seeks to address this by developing an ecosystem for flexible hybrid electronics manufacturing. This talk will provide an overview of the latest trends and developments in flexible-hybrid electronics manufacturing, including existing challenges and opportunities. The presentation will also outline the vision and roadmap for the flexible-hybrid electronics manufacturing infrastructure and ecosystem.

Biography: Paul Semenza is a consultant to the FlexTech Alliance, supporting its proposal for the Flexible Hybrid Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute, and since the $171 million award in August 2015, working to launch the institute. He has managed market research in flat panel displays, touch, flexible electronics, and solar PV, including serving as President of DisplaySearch and Solarbuzz (as part of The NPD Group), and before that at iSuppli and Stanford Resources. Prior to his work in market research, Paul worked in technology policy, as a program officer at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council, and an analyst for the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA). Paul started his career in engineering, as a member of technical staff at The Analytic Sciences Corporation. He has a Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering and a Master's degree in Electro-optics, both from Tufts University, and a Master's degree in Public Policy, from the Harvard Kennedy School.

Wearable brain activity monitoring: history, applications, and emerging trends
Walid Soussou, PhD
President
Wearable Sensing

Over the past few decades, concerted neuroscience research and developments in brain activity monitoring technology have revealed new insight into the workings of the brain in dynamic environments. These developments are propelling new applications for wearable brain activity monitoring in the real-world. For medical applications, demand is for early diagnosis with sports or battle field injuries, as well as the long-term home monitoring of various neurological disorders such as: traumatic brain injury (TBI), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and others. Furthermore, pharmaceutical companies and individual patients are seeking methods for rapid quantification of neuro-active drug effects outside the lab, such as for treatment of depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or other neuropsychological ailments. On the consumer electronics side, potential applications of wearable brain activity monitoring are burgeoning into entire fields: brain computer interfaces (BCI), neuro-gaming, neuro-ergonomics, neuro-marketing, neuro-education, peak-performance neurofeedback, and augmented cognition. This presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of the current applications and challenges for wearable brain activity monitoring. The talk will also discuss innovative commercial solutions to date, and potential future applications of this latest frontier of wearable sensors.

Biography: Dr. Walid Soussou is the CEO of Quantum Applied Science and Research Inc. (QUASAR), where he leads and manages the company's efforts at developing applications of dry-electrode EEG technology for cognitive assessment. Dr. Soussou is also President of Wearable Sensing, which has licensed QUASAR's dry sensor interface technology and is manufacturing and marketing it. Dr. Soussou leverages his PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Southern California (USC), expertise in brain-computer interfaces, and experience in sleep research, for developing commercial applications of QUASAR's wearable EEG/EOG/EMG/ECG sensors. With funding from NIH, NSF, and DoD, QUASAR has developed a suite of unique zero-prep physiological sensors with reliable gauges for assessment of cognitive engagement, workload, fatigue, and stress. These gauges are valuable tools with both military and non-military applications, as they enable monitoring cognitive states of soldiers, air traffic controllers, employees, customers, students, or anyone in real-world environments.

Bio-integrated flexible and stretchable electronics: new modality for wearable electronics
Pulin Wang, PhD
Managing Director
Stretch Med

Recent advancements in wireless technologies prompted the Forbes Magazine to name 2014 as the year of wearable technology.  Meanwhile, physiological sensors have stayed unchanged due to the lack of fundamental breakthrough in the form factors of wafer-based electronics.  Metals and inorganic semiconducting materials are intrinsically planar, rigid, and brittle.  As a result, integrated circuit (IC)-based wearable devices are unable to maintain intimate and prolonged contact with the curved, soft, and dynamic human body to retrieve long-term, high-fidelity physiological signals.  Recent advancements in flexible and stretchable electronics have provided viable solutions to bio-integrated electronics.  Among many breakthroughs, epidermal electronic systems (EES) represent a paradigm-shift wearable device whose thickness and mechanical properties can match that of human epidermis.  As a result, the EES can conform to human skin like a temporary transfer tattoo and deform with the skin without detachment or fracture.  The EES was first developed to monitor electrophysiological signals, and thereafter skin temperature, skin hydration, sweat, and others.  This talk will provide a comprehensive overview of bio-integrated flexible and stretchable electronics and, specifically, EES technologies.  The talk will include a discussion of the key commercial and R&D technology players, the overall supply chain ecosystem, emerging trends, existing challenges, and the most promising initial use cases and applications.

Biography: Pulin Wang is the co-founder and managing director of Stretch Med, Inc. Pulin received his PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a MS in Technology Commercialization from the University of Texas at Austin.  He has co-authored three patent applications in the areas of life sciences and flexible electronics. In addition to technical expertise, Pulin has worked as a Senior Associate at Austin Technology Incubator, a Venture Scholar at G51 Texas Super Angel Capital Management, and a Technology Commercialization Analyst for Global Commercialization Group of UT Austin.

Technology Showcase Presenters

Electromagnetic and system simulation for wearable electronics applications
Nikki Hallgrimsdottir
Silicon Valley Sales Manager
CST of America

Wearable devices are becoming increasingly popular both in consumer and industrial applications and their role will only increase in the future. The miniaturization and integration of more components and functions in smaller and lighter form-factors introduces unique challenges in the design process compared with traditional technology platforms. Simulating such devices early in the design process helps in optimizing their efficiency, ensuring reliable operation, and reducing cost of development and testing. This talk will briefly explain recent advances in Computational Electromagnetics and other simulation domains that allow for collaborative design and optimization of virtual prototypes from the material up to the system level. With its leading-edge solvers, user-friendly interface, and powerful technology partnerships, CST STUDIO SU ITE® offers a unique platform for handling the design challenges of tomorrow’s electronic devices.

Biography: Nikki Hallgrimsdottir earned her BBA degree in International Business from The University of Texas McCombs School of Business. She is currently Silicon Valley Sales Manager at CST of America, with a focus on helping Consumer Electronics customers streamline and improve their design flows. Prior to joining CST, Nikki worked as a Sales and Application Engineer in the Industrial Automation Industry with a focus on increasing throughput and quality of high-speed manufacturing lines through the implementation of robotic systems, automated machine vision inspection, and traceability.

Energy harvesting methods for wearable electronics applications
Kathleen Vaeth, PhD
VP Engineering
MicroGen Systems

The availability of small, lightweight, and affordable low-power microcontrollers, RF transmitters, and MEMS sensors has opened up the possibilities for smart, integrated wireless sensor networks for the human body and its extended environment.  Energy harvesting technology is a key factor in enabling increased intelligence and proliferation of these sensor networks, which are currently limited by available battery power. In this presentation, an overview of the types of energy harvesting available for wireless sensors will be presented, highlighting the tradeoffs of each approach in the wearable electronics ecosystem. The design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of MicroGen Systems’ MEMS-based piezoelectric vibrational energy harvesters, and their utility for powering wireless sensors and transmitters, will also be discussed, and examples of powering systems with energy harvested from mechanical vibration and shock impulses will be presented.

Biography: Dr. Kathleen Vaeth earned her BS degree in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University, where she was a Kodak Fellow, and her MS and PhD degrees in Chemical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she was a Hertz Fellow. She is currently the Vice President of Engineering at MicroGen Systems, developing MEMS piezoelectric vibrational energy harvesters. Prior to joining MicroGen Systems, Dr. Vaeth worked 12 years at Eastman Kodak as the as a Project Leader and Senior Research Scientist in Kodak Research Labs, where she specialized in development of technologies for the inkjet and thin film display markets. Her research interests spans the design, fabrication and characterization of devices, relating their performance to the materials used in their construction. Dr. Vaeth has over 20 publications, 25 US patents, and has given numerous invited lectures and talks.

Cables in motion: applications for wearable sensors and electronics
Paul Wagner
Chairman and CEO
Minnesota Wire

With today’s rapidly changing technology, companies are consistently looking for fresh ideas to give their products a competitive edge. Sometimes, the best new concept stems from a re-examination of the existing product. Minnesota Wire is making the old new again with never seen before cable and wire solutions including iSTRETCH® cable! Nearly every electronic consumer good relies on some type of wire or cable. At the same time, most companies design around commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) cable without a second thought. Standard cables’ constraints and limitations force designers to modify their inventions and products to allow for common failures. Our lightweight and stretchable cables give you a built-in competitive advantage! What choice do companies have but to utilize the cable and wire put forth by the industry? Minnesota Wire developed iSTRETCH® cable and light weight cables to outperform all other cables, especially in today’s technology fueled atmosphere. The iSTRETCH® design allows for greatly enhanced flex life and durability, while maintaining an elegant look and feel. Our carbon based lightweight cables reduce weight up to 30%. Our cables are currently used in several diverse industries including wearable electronics, audio and antenna markets. This presentation will introduce companies and designers to the benefits of lightweight and iSTRETCH® cable and how MN Wire’s cables will revolutionize your products and companies.

Biography: Paul J. Wagner is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Minnesota Wire. During his time leading MN Wire, Mr. Wagner greatly expanded the company’s market exposure which now includes the medical, defense, industrial and commercial sectors; and he has provided strategic direction to evolve the business into a high technology development house primarily through federal research and development grants. The company has a greater than 80% capture rate on federal R&D grants (compared with a 13% national average) and won the prestigious Tibbetts Award in 2007 for excellence in Small Business Innovation Research. In 2004 Mr. Wagner founded Defense Alliance, the region’s defense and homeland security industry network that is the first of its kind nationally. It was awarded the Small Business Administration’s Veteran Business Champion of the Year Award in 2007. The Defense Alliance operates one of the nation's three Advanced Defense Technologies Clusters for the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). The Advanced Power & Energy Cluster has helped member companies in 34 states obtain over $125 million in government and commercial contracts since 2010. In 1999 Paul was honored with the Governor's International Trade Award, was the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year ® 2011 awardee for the Upper Midwest Region (Minnesota, Wisconsin and the Dakotas) in the “Technology” category, and listed in TwinCities Business’ December 2011 issue as one of “200 Minnesotans You Should Know”. Mr. Wagner holds a Bachelor's degree in business with an emphasis in management from the University of Saint Thomas. He and his bride have five children and reside in Minnesota.

Past Speakers

MEMS based sensors for wearable device designs
Francois Beauchaud
Principal Engineer
Bosch Sensortec

Wearable devices and MEMS based sensors are tightly connected. Sensors used in wearable designs are currently inherited from applications driven by the mobile handset designs. As the wearable market develops and evolves, new sensor based solutions will be available. As such, sensor vendors are compelled to grow their MEMS sensor portfolios to best address the needs of such new use cases. Based on the current trends, the largest product development opportunities will come from advanced and novel data processing software. This presentation will provide details on the MEMS sensors currently used in most wearable designs (accelerometers, gyroscopes, magnetometers and pressure sensors), outline technical challenges, and cover examples of use cases enabled by the developer community. The talk will also provide an overview of potential new sensors for wearable devices and their applications, underlining how the tight coupling between sensors, processing subsystems, firmware algorithms and application development is essential for compact, power-efficient, and robust designs.

Biography: Francois Beauchaud started working with MEMS devices even before he graduated with a Masters Degree in Electronic Engineering from the Institut des Sciences Appliquees (INSA) of Lyon, France in 2007. While pursuing his Engineering Diploma, Francois also obtained a Master Degree in Microelectronics from the University Claude Bernard of Lyon. He is currently based in Palo Alto, California as a Principal Engineer at Bosch Sensortec. Francois previously held the position of Senior Field Applications Engineer North America for Bosch Sensortec from 2010 to 2014 and Applications Engineer for Bosch Sensortec in Germany from 2008 to 2010.

Barriers to reaching the full potential of wearables
Douglas Bogia, PhD
Mobile Health Lead Architect
Intel Corporation

Estimates of compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for wearables vary between 50% and 80% over the next 5 years. These growth rates represent an attractive market, but several barriers limit wearable device adoption. This presentation explores a broad range of these limitations (e.g., interoperability, data ownership, and security) that have applicability across many environments (e.g., industrial, military, infotainment, health & fitness). As more devices become connected to the Internet, a tremendous opportunity exists to fuse data from wearables and other "Internet of Things" devices to create innovative and compelling solutions. Often, this requires additional, adjacent architectural components such as gateways and cloud analytics, which will be briefly discussed as well. Finally, since the healthcare and fitness categories are presently the largest market spaces for wearables, the presentation covers unique challenges and proposes solutions tailored to these specific markets.

Biography: Doug Bogia is a Mobile Health Architect in Intel's Health and Life Sciences team. In 1995, Doug received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in Computer Supported Collaborative Work. Since joining Intel in 1995, Doug has held a number of positions ranging from implementing collaborative business and personal products, implementing small business support services, to creating telecommunication products. In 2002, he assisted with creating the Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture standard enabling the telecommunications industry to begin interoperable implementations in 2003. From 2005 to 2011, he shifted focus to the healthcare industry. Doug led the formation of the ISO/IEEE 11073 Personal Health Devices Work Group and served five years as the work group chair. Doug also chaired the Guidelines Control Board for the Continua Health Alliance and participated in the Bluetooth and USB Medical Devices Working Groups. In late 2011, he joined the Context Awareness team and studied mechanisms to improve device awareness of surrounding context and provided recommendations based on that information. In 2013, he transitioned back into Health and Life Sciences to assist customers with addressing their mobile computing goals.

Wearables: the path to credible product category from interesting niche
James Bruce
Director of Mobile Computing
ARM

The topic of wearables has increasingly made its way into the technology headlines. This class of product represents a diverse range of devices, including bands, smartwatches and glasses. These devices typically connect wirelessly to a smartphone providing a connection to the internet. ABI Research estimated about 50M wearables shipped in 2013. At CES, Embedded World and Mobile World Congress earlier this year, a wide range of new devices were launched and with Google's announcement of an Android version, Android Wear, specifically targeted for this area, the volumes are set to more than double in 2014. As with any emerging market, the initial set of pioneering products pursue a diverse range of technology approaches, as companies explore the right balance of functionality, cost, form factor and battery life. This presentation will examine the growth and chart the future of this market, including: (a) highlighting the changes ARM expects to see in the value chain around this market, given the use cases we expect to see for this category of products, (b) predicting some of the new user interface, sensor and security functionality, not present in the first wave of devices, that will be needed to make this a viable product category and not be relegated to (relatively) small niches, and (c) explore how these current products are constructed and share some of ARM's thoughts as to how these systems and the technologies that will be needed to deliver the power and performance cost points needed for future solutions

Ultra-low power sensor sampling solution for wearable device applications
Mark Buccini
Director, Microcontroller Applications
Texas Instruments

To effectively utilize the extremely limited power source typical with most wearable electronic technology, exercising the most energy-aware embedded design practices is an absolute must. This presentation details a practical ultra-low power (e.g. 1uA) sensor sampling solution implemented using low-cost, off-the-shelf components and readily available sensors. This presentation will build-up, through a series of examples, a complete signal-chain starting from the power source, sensor, data conversion, embedded processor concluding with the user interface. The concept of managing an overall system power budget will be the fundamental undertone of the presentation. The importance of energy-aware firmware, system architecture, duty cycling, sensor measurement, supply voltage and clock gating will be reviewed. Advanced but realistic techniques including the usage of autonomous peripherals, dynamic voltage scaling and full power gating will be presented in detail. Using the techniques discussed, a working ultra-low power sensor sampling deeply embedded system will be demonstrated as part of this interactive presentation.

Biography: Mark E. Buccini is responsible for new product and marketing strategy as a staff member at Texas Instruments with 25 years' experience. Recently he has driven the introduction of new family of magnetic hall-effect sensors, monolithic automotive integrated smart BLDC motor drivers, as well as the creation of the TI's Smart Grid Business Unit. He was directly responsible for the world-wide launch, new product definition, applications and product marketing of the popular MSP430 family of ultra-low power microcontrollers. Mark lives in Allen, Texas, is married with two children and has a Bachelor's of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan.

Force sensors: the next "killer app" for wearable devices?
Ian Campbell
Founder and CEO
NextInput

Wearable devices have rapidly become smart sensor hubs with the introduction of MEMS based sensor technologies such as microphones, accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure sensors. As market demand increases for new differentiating features and functionality, wearable device manufacturers are seeking new sensor technologies to include in their products. In the past few years, manufacturers have experimented with adding MEMS force sensors to wearable devices to replace older “binary” human interfaces – mechanical switches, knobs, and sliders – and to add new features like pulse heart rate monitoring. These pioneering manufacturers faced many challenges around the size, cost, and durability of MEMS force sensor technology for human interface applications. NextInput has solved a number of these challenges with its MEMS based touch technology, ForceTouch, and is now working with major wearable OEMs to solve the remaining engineering challenges related to mass producing MEMS force sensor solutions for wearable devices. This talk will provide a brief overview and history of force sensor technology, describe NextInput's approach along with its advantages and disadvantages, discuss potential applications of force sensors on the wearable device platform, and outline the current technical challenges that NextInput's team is working to solve.

Biography: Ian Campbell began his career designing automated manufacturing lines for companies such as Nokia, GM, and Daimler/Mercedes. Later, Mr. Campbell worked as a research engineer at the Georgia Tech Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory. After receiving his MBA and Masters of Science in Aerospace Engineering from Georgia Tech, Ian worked as a management consultant advising Fortune 100 companies in strategy, operations, and product development. Ian co-founded NextInput in 2012 with Dr. Ryan Diestelhorst, also a Georgia Tech alum, with the mission to develop the world's best force-sensitive interfaces and MEMS based force sensors.

Powering wearable device sensors for extended battery life
John Demiray
Sr. Strategic Marketing Manager, Mobile Products
NXP

Wearable devices of the future are expected to provide critical life-enhancing features. These features will support monitoring of the heart rate, blood pressure and other biometric vital signs in addition to tracking our fitness and activity levels. At the same time, they will need to connect to a network to send and receive frequent updates. Wearable devices available today do not reach their potential as a critical part of our life and health due to frequent and time consuming charging requirements. If, in the future, wearable devices are expected to be more of an extension of our health and lifestyle, technological advances are needed to reduce the power consumption of sensors and internet connectivity when these functions are not in operation. This presentation will cover the optimization of power architectures to increase the battery life and reduce the charge time of wearable devices to make them truly available in our everyday life.

Biography: John Demiray is Sr. Strategic Marketing Manager for mobile products at NXP. John has over 25 years of experience in the semiconductor industry, spanning marketing and business development responsibilities in the areas of smartphones, tablets, power management and enterprise networking. Before NXP, John was a Marketing Manager at Renesas, directing all aspects of new product definition, business development, and product launch for power MOSFETs, optical image stabilization, CMOS image sensors and wireless/USB charging products. John has a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of North Carolina and a Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Middle East Technical University in Turkey.

Toward an open data ecosystem for wearable devices
Rachel Kalmar, PhD
Data Scientist
Misfit Wearables

From activity trackers to Google Glass, wearables are all the rage. But who should get access to the data? Unfortunately, just because you wear a device doesn't mean that you get access to your data. As a data scientist, I've been wearing 20+ activity trackers for the past 18 months. What have I learned? I've learned that I can't get my time-resolved data from these devices. Why not? Issues of privacy, lack of standards, and unclear business models for personal data collection and sharing make this difficult. Given this, where we're headed is not toward an Internet of Things, but toward many siloed Internets of Things. This talk will discuss barriers and enablers to creating an open data ecosystem that lays the foundation for one integrated network of connected devices.

Biography: Dr. Rachel Kalmar is a data scientist at Misfit Wearables, where she wrangles noisy data and tries to quantify anything and everything she can. A Stanford neuroscience PhD, she's spent over a decade using data to explain, predict and influence behavior. She is active in the Bay Area hardware community and runs Sensored, a 1000+ person meetup group for people working on sensor devices and applications (meetup.com/Sensored). Rachel is an alum of the d.school, Singularity University, and Rock Health, and her favorite hashtag is #geekparadise.

Government regulations: the impact on wearable device manufacturers
Jitendra "Jitty" Malik, PhD
Partner
Alston & Bird

Wearable sensors are becoming increasingly prevalent in our society to monitor various aspects of human activity, including human physiology. Accordingly, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") is becoming increasingly vigilant in monitoring certain wearable technologies. Congress also is signaling its intent to scrutinize the information wearable devices collect and process. Recently, the FDA issued guidance explaining which wearable devices it intends to regulate and how it intends to regulate them. Depending on the intended application, a wearable device manufacturer could subject themselves to scrutiny from the FDA. The FDA's regulations will have broad implications for developers of wearable technologies. Among the topics covered in the talk, we will discuss the FDA regulations, including which wearable devices will be regulated by the FDA, how the FDA will make a determination whether a wearable device will be subject to its regulations, and an overview of the kinds of information a manufacturer will have to provide to comply with the regulatory regime. Some device manufacturers have already approached the FDA, and their discussions with the FDA have been made public. The contents of these discussions will be presented to provide the audience with a better understanding of the FDA's thoughts as it comes to its own regulations. We will also discuss some of the concerns expressed by Congress, and the information Congress has requested in the wearable device space, in an effort to better understand future regulatory changes.

Biography: Dr. Jitendra "Jitty" Malik is a partner in the Alston & Bird’s Intellectual Property Litigation Group. Dr. Malik's scientific expertise includes electronic materials, semiconductor processing, adhesive science, polymer chemistry and physics, electrochemistry, organometallic chemistry and biochemistry. Prior to attending law school, Dr. Malik was a project supervisor for a leading semiconductor materials manufacturer. Dr. Malik has been published numerous times in scholarly scientific and legal literature.

Wearable technologies: market trends, solutions and business models
Sam Massih
Director, Wearable Sensors
InvenSense

Wearable technologies have only been in the mainstream for 3+ years now and we are already asking the question: "why hasn't it hit the mass market yet"? We'll look at where it's been, what's the market feedback on these products, and what are the new features of the next generation of devices. We'll discuss how the sensor platform system solutions from InvenSense will deliver some of these next generation usage cases which will move this market from the early adopter phase to the high volume consumer mainstream. We'll also dive deeper into the end-to-end business model for the wearable platform. Understanding the OEM's business model will help companies set their sensor platform system strategy. In the case of InvenSense, we thought if we can help our customers succeed in their business model, we can become more than just a sensor vendor to our customers. We'll discuss how this approach will help the OEM with the monetization of their cloud based business model.

Biography: Sam Massih is a semiconductor industry veteran with 18 years of experience in establishing, growing, and managing technology based businesses. His entire career has centered around defining and launching new semiconductor product lines targeted at consumer markets such as mobile, tablet, STB, LCD TV, DSC, and now wearable technologies. Sam's past adventures has taken him to Maxim, NXP (formally Philips Semiconductor), and Semtech where he's been responsible for establishing and growing analog video, LED, and touch interface businesses, respectively. Sam's most recent challenge has been at InvenSense where he is focusing on enabling the next generation of wearable products in the fitness, mobile, and smart bands markets. These markets will require more sensor data to drive better lifestyle decisions, provide day-to-day utility, and generate more valuable data for the cloud services. Mr. Massih holds a MBA from the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, a MSEE from University of New York, and a BSEE from Pennsylvania State University.

Assessment of reliability standards for wearable medical devices
John McNulty, PhD
Principal Engineer
Exponent

Development of standard methodologies and qualification procedures enables the medical electronics device industry to enact changes more quickly, adopt new technologies, and bring products to market in a shorter time. Standard methodologies and qualification procedures are of particular need in the relatively fast-moving market segment of wearable and portable medical devices, which is transitioning from devices based in controlled hospital environments to devices that can be operated by non-healthcare professionals, worn on the body, and operate in a wide variety of environments. This presentation will report on the work done by an iNEMI project team to develop a reliability qualification methodology for certain types of wearable electronic medical devices. It will include a discussion of the specific requirements and testing needed when considering wearable medical devices, and a review of current industry approaches along with identified gaps and recommended mitigation strategies.

Biography: Dr. John McNulty is a Principal Engineer in Exponent's Materials and Corrosion Engineering practice, where he has worked since 2009. He chairs the iNEMI working group on reliability standards for implantable medical electronic devices, and is a participant in the working group focused on wearable/portable medical electronic devices. His areas of specialization include failure analysis of components and systems, reliability testing and analysis, and electronic/opto-electronic packaging and assembly. He received a PhD in Materials Engineering from UC Santa Barbara and a BS in Materials Science and Engineering from UC Berkeley. He is a licensed Professional Engineer and a Certified Reliability Engineer.

Trends in wearables manufacturing: challenges and opportunities
David Michael, PhD
Director, Core Vision Tool Development
Cognex Corporation

Manufacturing wearables requires fast production ramp up with quick product changeover. At the same time, consumer buyers of wearable devices insist on high product quality and low cost. These requirements parallel the overall shift from traditional labor-intensive manufacturing to advanced technology-based manufacturing. Wearable device manufacturing trends are towards tighter integration of R&D and production, mass customization, increased automation, and a focus on the environment without increasing costs or sacrificing performance. These trends hold as wearables incorporate new sensor technologies, as well as new flexible circuitry and displays. They also hold for wearable devices for fitness, healthcare, medical, infotainment, military, and industrial applications. I will discuss these trends as well as some of the technical challenges in wearables manufacturing with scaling, short product life cycles, high quality, and low cost. I will also provide specific examples on how automation and machine vision can address some of these challenges, especially with the newest, cutting-edge devices.

Biography: Dr. David Michael received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York in 1985 and the S.M. degree in Radiological Science and Ph.D. degree in Computer Vision from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1986, and 1992 respectively. He joined Cognex Corporation in 1992 where he is currently Director, Core Vision Tool Development. Dr. Michael has authored or coauthored 50 issued US patents in different aspects of machine vision including camera and robot calibration, image registration, color, image processing and inspection.

Timing chips for wearable applications: design and performance considerations
Steve Pratt
Marketing Director
SiTime

Today's wearable devices are pushing the envelope on functionality, battery life and form factor. As wearables continue to increase functionality, timing solutions help optimize the performance of all operations such as wireless connectivity, sensor interface, and MCU processing. All these subsystems benefit from small and accurate reference clocks. For example, WiFi and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) wireless connectivity must be maintained between the wearable device and a mobile phone. During long periods of inactivity, an accurate sleep clock will significantly improve battery life in wearables by enabling longer sleep intervals and fewer and shorter transmissions. Similarly, non-real time data transfer of real-time sensor activity occurring between periods of data transmission requires accurate time stamping. And the wearable's MCU reference clock must be precisely picked for the optimal operating frequency and duty cycled to optimize power. While the traditional quartz oscillators meet the power and accuracy specifications of wearable devices, they cannot easily meet the size requirements. On the other hand, unlike quartz, MEMS based oscillators are advantageous for wearable device applications because they can meet the all three main requirements -- power, accuracy, and size -- in combination. The MEMS oscillators' advantage stems from the fact that they can put into a chip-scale package (CSP), while quartz is limited to ceramic packages that are bulky. This talk will provide an overview of where timing chips are used in a typical wearable device system, how they affect the overall performance, and what can be done to make wearable devices more efficient.

Biography: Steve Pratt is responsible for the new product and strategic direction at SiTime. Steve is an analog semiconductor industry veteran with over 20 years of experience in defining new products and managing business units. Over the past three years at SiTime, he has started and built-up the mobile product line to be one of the major product line revenue generators within the company. Prior to SiTime, Steve made significant strategic marketing contributions at Maxim, Micrel, and Monolithic Power Systems (MPS). In his free time, Steve enjoys cycling, running, and tinkering with cars.

Strategies for security in the wearable ecosystem
Ray Potter
CEO
SafeLogic

Wearables play a critical role collecting, processing, and archiving increasingly personal data. Security strategies must be robust to match the importance of the information at stake, even if the device itself is scaled down. Our biggest problem? It simply isn't easy to design strong security with such constrained space requirements. Practitioners have a running start, building on successes with smartphones and tablets, but the challenge is taken one step further with today's tiny but surprisingly powerful wearable devices. This talk will cover: (1) potential vulnerabilities in wearable devices, (2) technical constraints in the leading wearables that make security challenging, (3) similarities to other mobile devices and lessons learned, (4) techniques used in mobile security that will apply to wearables, and (5) industries and verticals which will have use cases for secured wearable devices.

Biography: Ray Potter is the CEO and co-founder of SafeLogic. Previously, Ray founded Apex Assurance Group and led the Security Assurance program at Cisco Systems. He has been recognized as a thought leader in next generation security technologies, speaking at the RSA Conference, CTIA MobileCon, Super Mobility Week, (ISC)2 Congress, Wearables DevCon, and the International Cryptographic Module Conference, among others. Ray currently lives in Palo Alto and enjoys cycling and good bourbon (although not at the same time).

Integrating sensors seamlessly with clothing in mass production
Akseli Reho
CEO
Clothing+

To integrate sensors seamlessly with clothing is meaningful because then wearable devices are built into what we are already used to wearing all the time. Thus, clothing and textile accessories are a natural platform for gathering biometric sensor data from the human body. Also, the trend of sensors and other electronics shrinking in size, appearance and cost is supporting the integration trend with textiles. But, on the other hand, clothing and especially underwear is a challenging integration platform. The material volume of the product is minimal, the maintenance environment like machine washing is harsh, the design plays a big role, and the price and logistic targets are tough, etc. New technologies and interdisciplinary approaches are needed to make sensor integration with textiles come true. In this presentation, I will discuss the characteristics of embedding and integrating sensors into textiles in mass production scale, both for sports and medical applications.

Biography: Akseli Reho is the founder and CEO of the Finnish wearable sensor company Clothing+. With a M.Sc. degree in telecommunications, Mr. Reho has been an active member in the wearables community since 1998 and his work has been instrumental in bridging the gap between electronics and textiles in manufacturing. Under his direction, Clothing+ has been mass-producing millions of textile-integrated wearable sensors since 2002 and continues to make an ever greater impact on the sports and medical markets.

MEMS and sensors in wearables: market overview
Jordan Selburn
Sr. Principal Analyst
IHS

Wearable electronics have rapidly emerged as the next big wave for MEMS and sensors in consumer electronics after smartphones and tablets. We predict that close to 500 million sensors will ship in wearables by 2019 up from 66 million units in 2013. The presentation will analyze the market by wearable device and by sensor type. The market drivers for this sensor boom will be reviewed, including: (1) fitness and health monitoring, and (2) sensors for user interface applications, especially MEMS microphones for voice command. Notably, the adoption of environment monitoring sensors (such as humidity, UV, and others) results more from a technology push, by both sensor suppliers and wearable device OEMs, than from a real pull from the consumers. This talk will also assess the impact of the ecosystem on the adoption of sensors (for example, the influence of dedicated operating systems such as Google Wear and sensor hubs). Finally, the specificities of the wearable market will be reviewed, as compared to handsets, along with the opportunities and risks it bears for sensor suppliers.

Biography: Jordan Selburn leads IHS research in consumer electronics (CE), with a particular focus on CE hardware and the semiconductors that enable these platforms. Within the CE market, his research has concentrated especially on set-top boxes (STBs) and other audio/video devices. Additionally, he is a leading authority on semiconductor design including the trends and forecasts in the "system-on-a-chip" space. Previously, Selburn served as the director of marketing for Amphion Semiconductor and as a principal analyst at Gartner Group. He has also worked for LSI Logic, Cadence Design Systems, Agilent and Harris Corporation in various engineering and marketing capacities. Selburn holds a Master of Science degree from Stanford University, a Master of Business Administration from Santa Clara University, and a Bachelor of Science from the University of Michigan.

Preventing the terrible wearables: designing robust wearable electronics
Cheryl Tulkoff
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
DfR Solutions

Wearable electronics offer both significant opportunities and significant challenges to the design community. To ensure reliable and safe products, designers must be aware of new device packaging constraints, environmental conditions like sweat, UV and temperature exposure, tumble and drop, bending and torque, and the inevitable water immersion. Wireless communication and battery life needs must also be considered. The news is already littered with examples of failing and marginally performing wearable electronics. This presentation is designed to help you avoid those pitfalls by understanding the wearable use environment and designing appropriately for it. Material and component selection and protection options will be discussed. Effective strategies for test plan development will also be identified. Wearable electronics test strategies must be tailored specifically for the individual product design and materials, the use environment, and reliability needs.

Biography: Cheryl Tulkoff has over 22 years of experience in electronics manufacturing focusing on failure analysis and reliability. She is passionate about applying her unique background to enable her clients to maximize and accelerate product design and development while saving time, managing resources, and improving customer satisfaction. Throughout her career, Cheryl has had extensive training experience and is a published author and a senior member of both ASQ and IEEE. She views teaching as a two-way process that enables her to impart her knowledge on to others as well as reinforce her own understanding and ability to explain complex concepts through student interaction. A passionate advocate of continued learning, Cheryl has taught electronics workshops that introduced her to numerous fascinating companies, people, and cultures.

Call for Speakers

If you’d like to participate as a speaker, please call Dr. Mike Pinelis at 734-277-3599 or send a brief email with your proposed presentation topic to mike@memsjournal.com. All speakers will receive a complimentary pass to the conference.

Conference scope includes topics related to wearable sensors and electronics, such as:

  • Worldwide wearable device trends: market drivers, demographic factors, emerging markets and applications, disruptive technologies, government policy effects.
  • Business aspects: competitive forces and dynamics, pricing trends, mergers and acquisitions, analyst forecasts and projections, manufacturing developments, technology transfer, regulatory compliance, ecosystems and hubs, company formation.
  • Technology trends and developments: wearable device architecture, sensor hubs, ultra-low power systems and components, energy harvesting, micro batteries and energy storage, supercapacitors, sensor fusion, software algorithms, context awareness, virtual sensors, connectivity with smartphones.
  • Emerging applications: digital health, body area networks, medical diagnostics and screening, genomics, safety and security, environmental, virtual reality, indoor navigation, quantified self, usage paid insurance.
  • Emerging manufacturing techniques and materials: flexible and printed electronics, smart glass, streamlined assembly techniques.
  • Emerging types of sensors: touch, pressure, thermal, radiation, humidity, chemical, high- performance image and IR, air and pollution, magnetic, water, radar, high performance inertial, high performance microphones, microphone arrays.
  • Emerging types of actuators: high performance micro speakers, optical zoom, micro shutters, energy harvesters.